Using Lua-enabled sysbench

A quite common benchmark for MySQL is sysbench. It was written nearly 10 years ago by Alexey Kopytov.

Sysbench has modes to benchmark raw CPU performance, mutex speed, scheduler overhead and file IO performance. The probably most often used sysbench mode is OLTP. This benchmark mimics a OLTP scenario with small transactions hitting an optimized database. There are many variables to play with, most important is the number of simulated application threads (option –num-threads). The OLTP benchmark can be run read-only, then it does 14 SELECT queries per transaction. Or it can be run read-write which adds 2 UPDATEs and one INSERT and DELETE. Read more

On performance of JDBC drivers.

Back when the first version of the MariaDB Java Client was released, someone asked in the comments about the performance characteristics of the driver compared to ConnectorJ. I answered with hand-waving, saying that nobody does anything stupid, the performance of the drivers would be roughly the same, but I promised to measure it and tell the world one day. And now that day has come. The day where three MySQL JDBC drivers (ConnectorJ, MariaDB JDBC, and Drizzle JDBC) are compared against each other. Unlike the server, which gets benchmarking attention all the time, there is no standard benchmark for connectors, so I needed to improvise, while trying to keep the overhead of the server minimal. Read more

Sysbench OLTP: MySQL-5.6 vs. MariaDB-10.0

Oracle has now launched MySQL-5.6.10-GA, so it is time to come up with some new benchmark results. The test candidates in this benchmark run are

  • MySQL-5.5.29
  • MySQL-5.6.10
  • MariaDB-5.5.28a
  • MariaDB-10.0.1

The 5.5 versions are in because I wanted to check for any regressions. In the past we have often seen performance regressions in newer versions which were caused by new features.

This time the benchmark was run on a different box. The main difference is that this box does not have SSD but a high performance RAID-5 with 512M of battery-backed cache. Read more

MariaDB 5.5 performance on Windows

We haven’t posted any Windows benchmarks for a while, and MariaDB for Windows contains some specific improvements which might not be widely know since we haven’t talked much about them yet. This post is an attempt to fix that. We’ll also share current MySQL 5.5 numbers.

My setup is an 8 core 2 socket server (yes, a little bit dated for today, but it is the best machine I have at my disposal), 10K SAS disks with RAID1. I ran sysbench 0.4 single table / 1,000,000 records. I ran the benchmark over a network, with the number of concurrent clients ranging from 4 to 4096. Read more

How To Tune MariaDB Write Performance

This article describes how I tuned MariaDB to give the best write throughput with SSD based storage.

When you have a write-heavy application writing into InnoDB, you will probably experience the InnoDB Checkpoint Blues. The effect manifests as stalls – short periods of time where the troughput falls to zero and I/O activity goes crazy. The phenomenon is well known and described i.e. here. More background about checkpointing can be found here.

The XtraDB fork of the InnoDB engine (and heart of Percona Server) contains some patches with the goal to overcome this odd behavior. Read more

5.5 Series Sysbench OLTP Results

A few days ago MariaDB, MySQL and Percona all three released new versions of the 5.5 server. So I decided it’s time to run sysbench once more and compare the OLTP performance. The test candidates are:

  • MariaDB-5.5.24, using either XtraDB (default) or InnoDB
  • MySQL-5.5.25
  • Percona Server 5.5.24-26.0

For the benchmarks I used our trusty old pitbull machine which has 24 cpu cores, 24G of RAM and a nice RAID-0 composed of 3 SAS SSD.

The benchmark was sysbench-0.5 multi-table OLTP, using 8 tables with total 10G of data. InnoDB buffer pool was 16G, InnoDB log group capacity 4G (the maximum for MySQL). Read more

MariaDB-5.3 optimizer benchmark

When I published the MariaDB-5.3.4 sysbench results I said “if your workload includes complex (sub)queries, then you will probably benefit more from MariaDBs new optimizer features”. Today I will present some benchmark results for complex workload.

The benchmark is DBT3, an implementation of the TPC-H specification. DBT3 is written in C and hosted at Sourceforge.

The DBT3 benchmark can run at different scale factors – defining the size of the database. I used a scale factor of 30 which yields ~30GB of raw data and ~48GB of disk footprint. The machine running the benchmark had 16G of memory. Read more