MariaDB Server Fest 17 Nov 2022

The MariaDB Foundation will be hosting a Server Fest on Thursday 17 November 2022. This time it’ll be a hybrid event, harnessing the energy that comes from many of the participants being present in person.

To encourage interaction, the event will be streamed live, but will not immediately be made available online, so don’t miss out on this opportunity to interact with the speakers and MariaDB members in person!

The keynote speaker will be Wikimedia Foundation’s Manuel Arostegui. The schedule and further details will be announced soon.

We start at 14:00 Paris time (CET) – 8:00am New York, 20:00 Beijing.

Regressions in recent MariaDB Server releases

Our most recent MariaDB Server release introduced some regressions starting with the 10.6 series, affecting 10.7 – 10.9 as well. This blog post is here to explain the problems in hopes that the impact is minimized. We are likely going to release a new version of MariaDB correcting these problems soon.

InnoDB Full Text Index on tables causes an assertion error (MDEV-29342)

There was a bug in the InnoDB Storage Engine where the full text index could go out of sync with the actual table data. This would happen when only one new row was inserted between the last InnoDB sync (which happens asynchronously) and a server shutdown.

Publishing of Contribution Statistics

In the last meeting, the MariaDB Foundation Board proposed the regular publishing of contribution statistics. This post is an update on our progress and the first report.

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Generating MariaDB Metrics

Something that is very important to us in the MariaDB Foundation is “Openness”. This is not only in the open source nature of MariaDB, but we are also very transparent in what happens with the MariaDB source code. With that in mind we have been working on ways to generate metrics that show information about the community in a consumable form.

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The Path to Code Contributions in MariaDB Server

I have been working for the MariaDB Foundation as the Chief Contributions Officer for a couple of weeks and it is fantastic being part of the MariaDB family again. Part of my job is to help the community massage pull requests into something that we can merge. I am, however, finding that one of the worst parts of my job is having to say “no” to contributions that clearly took a lot of time and effort on the part of the developer.

Contributions could be turned down or at least will require changes for a number of reasons.

Contribution Wish List

Would you like to contribute to the MariaDB Server code base, its feature set, its quality? Here’s what you can do to help – in other words, here’s our Contribution Wish List

Scratching your own itch

The assumption around code contributions is usually that the code contributor extends the product in a direction that corresponds to the contributor’s own needs, which in turn are close to the needs of other users. “Scratching your own itch” is the phrase commonly used.

Some itches are more for the common good

That said, we have also been approached by potential providers of contributions that would take a more general approach.

MariaDB & K8s: How to replicate MariaDB in K8s

In the previous blog we have seen how to create a statefulset MariaDB application. Also, we learned how replication works in MariaDB in this blog. Now, we will try to create a replicated statefulset application. As good references for creating this blog, I would like to give credit to the Kubernetes documentation as well as an example from Alibaba Cloud.

Configure replication

To replicate a MariaDB application we are going to create a statefulset that will consist of a single init container and one application container.

Contributions, our lifeblood

The lifeblood of MariaDB Foundation is contributions. Our trinity consists of the fundamental values of Adoption (of MariaDB Server), Openness (of the MariaDB Server codebase), and Continuity (of our operations and activities), all of which are centered around MariaDB Server. We rely on our financial sponsors to finance our activities, but the financial value of the code contributions we receive outshines the total sponsorship payments. That has been the case every year since MariaDB Server was launched.

Giving recognition to code contributions

The MariaDB Foundation has not given proper recognition to this fact, of the value of our contributions.