A mirror manager system to simplify the distribution of MariaDB binaries and packages

The MariaDB Foundation relies on public mirrors to distribute binaries and packages to the world. An overview of the full list can be seen at https://mirmon.mariadb.org. If you would like to volunteer to become a mirror, take a look at https://mariadb.com/kb/en/mirror-sites-for-mariadb/.

Our download page already automatically suggests one of those mirrors for you to download our binaries. Same goes for the repository configuration tool; see https://mariadb.org/download.

The purpose of this blog post is to present you a new system that we have been testing since December 2021 and that we believe is now ready for public adoption.

MariaDB replication using containers

In this blog we are going to demonstrate how to replicate a MariaDB database that runs in a Docker container (let’s call it primary) to one or more MariaDB servers that run in a Docker container (let’s call them replicas) using binary logging, a method that creates binary log files and an index that contains the record of all changes to the database (both data and structure). You can find an overview of how replication works here and you can find how to setup replication here. An example can be found in this GitHub script.

MariaDB 10.1 is stable GA

With the release of 10.1.8, MariaDB takes a next step. MariaDB 10.1 is now considered a stable release.

MariaDB 10.1 has a couple of main themes:

  • Security
  • High Availability
  • Scalability

During the last few years there have been many request for more security features in MariaDB. Actually it’s a trend in general. Since open source software is getting more attractive all the time, more functionality is wanted in areas where proprietary software typically has been leading. This is especially true for databases. In addition data privacy is a very hot topic.

The big new thing in security for MariaDB 10.1 is a complete data at rest encryption solution. …

MariaDB Eventually Consistent?

Background

Eventual consistency is a consistency model used in many large distributed databases which requires that all changes to a replicated piece of data eventually reach all affected replicas; conflict resolution is not handled and responsibility is pushed up to the application author in the event of conflicting updates [13].

Eventual consistency is a specific form of weak consistency; the storage system guarantees that if no new updates are made to the object, eventually all accesses will return the last updated value [14]. If no failures occur, the maximum size of the inconsistency window can be determined based on factors such as communication delays, the load on the system, and the number of replicas involved in the replication scheme [3]. …